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The Royal Society of Medicine Open Section

The Royal Society of Medicine Open Section has as its core remit the interface between healthcare and society. the remit encompasses biomedical ethics and law, medical humanities as well as healthcare quality, safety and leadership. I was President from 2012-2015.

Healcare Values Partnership and 5th RSM Primary Care Ethics Conference

The rhetoric of markets affects all clinicians and patients in some way, shaping the meanings attached to health and healthcare. With the growing significance of markets to healthcare in the UK and many other global settings, clinicians need to make ethical choices every day in commonplace situations. We explore these ethical issues and others which arise in primary care and healthcare more broadly, about how policy-makers, commissioners, clinicians and patients might think and act in a way that is both right and fair. A market in healthcare is often thought to damage positive health outcomes for patients and the working environment for practitioners because it introduces unworthy motives and immoral incentives. But is this so? And how might markets shape and serve the meaning that people ascribe to health and healthcare? In the poster we outline key ideas and arguments from an academic interdisciplinary conference addressing the meanings of markets in healthcare held on June 19th in London. We examine practical examples where humanities may improve understanding the interaction of market concepts with healthcare and re-examine the philosophical underpinnings of social justice. The conference was an event co-hosted by The Oxford Healthcare Values Partnership at Oxford University and the 5th RSM Primary Care Ethics Conference and is part of ongoing work to understand values in healthcare.‎

Andrew Papanikitas

BSc (Hons), MA, MBBS, DHMSA,DPMSA, DCH, MRCGP, PhD

NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer in General Practice

Research Summary

My PhD in medical education was awarded in June 2014 and is entitled, "From the classroom to the clinic: ethics education and general practice." The PhD is one element of a broad interest in professional ethics education as applied in medicine (and more specifically primary care) and in the notion that education represents the active translation of ideas between the academy and practice. In this post I am seeking to formalise a network of academics, educators, and clinicians with an interest in the study of ethics in, of, and for primary healthcare. The network has convened 5 conferences in four years and set up the Primary Care Ethics LinkedIn group, which is now approaching 300 members. In this post I will be seeking to build on my doctoral work.

I am currently collaborating on a TORCH Knowledge-Exchange project with Professor Joshua Hordern of Harris Manchester College and the Open Section of the Royal Society of Medicine that aims at understanding the meaning of compassion in healthcare in ways that are useful to clinicians, policy-makers and patients. We are convening workshops to inform this work in Oxford on September 30th and November 5th and a full-day conference at the RSM in London on December 3rd: please get in touch with me if interested or visit http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/knowledge-exchange/compassion  

Biography

Dr Andrew Papanikitas qualified as a general practitioner (MRCGP) in 2008. His PhD in medical education was awarded in June 2014 and is entitled, "From the classroom to the clinic: ethics education and general practice." The PhD is one element of a broad interest in professional ethics education as applied in medicine (and more specifically primary care) and in the notion that education represents the active translation of ideas between the academy and practice. Dr Papanikitas is part of an informal network of academics, educators, and clinicians with an interest in the study of ethics in, of, and for primary healthcare. He welcomes conversations on this topic, especially via the 'Primary Care Ethics' LinkedIn Group which is now approaching 300 members from the UK and internationally.

Dr Papanikitas is also Director of the Society of Apothercaries Course in Ethics and Philosophy of Healthcare. Running since 1978, the course is a prerequisite for the DPMSA (Diploma in philosophy of medicine of the Society of Apothecaries) examination and an accredited SSC for several London medical schools. He has run sessions on ethics, law and professionalism for GP trainers', GP trainees', and Sessional GPs' groups. He has taught medical ethics and law as well as inter-professional and clinical communication skills at King's College London (KCL). From 2010-2014 he has co-led a module on ethics law and professionalism for the KCL Department of Primary Healthcare and Public Health Sciences.

Dr Papanikitas holds degrees the History of Medicine, and Medical Law & Ethics, as well as postgraduate diplomas in history, philosophy and child health.  He is one of the founding members of the Royal Society of Medicine Student Members' Group and has served on the Trainees Section and is currently also on the council the GP and Primary Healthcare Section. He is President of the RSM Open Section from 2012-15.

He has written several books for students and trainees. With Peter Toon he is ethics and philosophy co-editor for the London Journal of Primary Care and peer-reviews for the Journal of Medical Ethics, The Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, and the Student BMJ among others.

Recent Publications

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My connections

  • Royal Society of Medicine, Open Section The RSM Open Section acts as an open channel of communication between medical and other health professionals, as well as others concerned with issues relating to health and health service provision, not least patients and policymakers. Section members include: Doctors, nurses, and a wide range of health professionals. Also welcomed: those with a professional interest in health matters, including ethicists, lawyers, journalists, academics, and managers from the private, public and voluntary sectors.
  • Society of Apothecaries' Course in Ethics and Philosophy as Applied to Healthcare The course runs in parallel with the Diploma Course in the History of Medicine and is intended to give a grounding in philosophical aspects of medical practice, including ethics, as applied to clinical practice. It also provides preparation for those wishing to take the Society of Apothecaries' diploma examination (DPMSA). The course is taught by an array of expert lecturers from around the UK.  The course runs annually and is held on Saturdays either at Apothecaries' Hall, Black Friars Lane, London, EC4V 6EJ or The Wellcome Trust, Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE or The Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, 183 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE. The course fee of £750 (£562.50* for undergraduates, proof of student status required) includes membership of the Wellcome Library. Application to register for the course should be made to Maria Ferran, The Faculty Administrator. Email: FacultyHP@apothecaries.org