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We are delighted to already have confirmed the following fantastic keynote speakers and workshop leads. More will follow so watch this space for details. Details of their talks will be posted closer to the event.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

 Professor Robbie Foy

Professor Robbie Foy

PHD, MFPHM, MSC, MRCGP, DCH
Professor of Primary Care, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences

Robbie is Professor of Primary Care at the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences and a General Practitioner in inner-city Leeds.

His field of work, implementation research, aims to inform policy decisions about how best to use resources to improve the uptake of research findings by evaluating approaches to change professional and organisational behaviour.

He was formerly a Clinical Senior Lecturer (Newcastle University) and an MRC Training Fellow in health services research (Universities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen). He also trained as a public health physician.

He was a 2006–7 Harkness/Health Foundation Fellow in Health Care Policy, based jointly between the Veteran’s Administration and RAND in Los Angeles.

He is a member of the NICE Implementation Strategy Group and was formerly the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal, Implementation Science.

Dr Ben Goldacre

Senior Clinical Research Fellow, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford

Ben Goldacre is a doctor, best-selling author, academic and campaigner. His work focuses on uses and misuses of science and statistics by journalists, politicians, drug companies and quacks. His book Bad Science reached #1 in the UK non-fiction charts and has sold over half a million copies worldwide. He has published extensively in all major newspapers and various academic journals, and appears regularly on radio and TV from Newsnight to QI. He has written government papers and reports on evidence based policy, founded a successful global campaign for research transparency, and currently works as an academic in the University of Oxford, where he runs the EBMdataLab building live data tools to make science and medicine better, like OpenPrescribing and OpenTrials. His blog is at www.badscience.net and he is @bengoldacre on twitter.

Muir

Professor Sir Muir Gray

CBE, FRCPSGLAS, FCLIP
Honorary Clinical Researcher, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford

Sir Muir has worked for the National Health Service in England since 1972, occupying a variety of senior positions during that time, including serving as the Director of Research and Development for Anglia and Oxford Regional Health Authority, and first establishing and  then being the  Director of the UK National Screening Committee. He founded the National Library for Health, and was the Director of Clinical Knowledge, Process, and Safety for the NHS (England) National Programme for IT, serving as the Director of the National Knowledge Service.  He was the first person to hold the post of Chief Knowledge Officer of the NHS (England), also serving as the co-Director of the Department of Health’s Quality Innovation Productivity and Prevention  (QIPP) Right Care Programme. Together with Sir Iain Chalmers, Muir was instrumental in establishing the Cochrane Collaboration.

Sir Muir is an internationally renowned authority on healthcare systems and has advised governments of several countries outside the UK including Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Spain and Germany.

Sir Muir is also a Visiting Professor in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences at the University of Oxford.  He received the CBE in 2000 and was knighted in 2005 for services to the National Health Service.

Sir Muir is working on the Value Based Healthcare theme within the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences and is interested in understanding and implementing value based healthcare, particularly focusing on the Triple Value framework.

Professor Carl Heneghan

BM, BCH, MA, MRCGP, DPhil
Professor of Evidence-Based Medicine and Director of the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford.

Carl is a clinical epidemiologist and leading expert in EBM and research methods. He has extensive experience in systematic reviews and quantitative methodologies relevant to primary care.

Carl's work includes investigating drug and device regulation, advising governments on regulatory evidence requirements and evidence-based healthcare projects in the public interest. He has worked with BBC Panorama to examine the evidence for sports drinks and for IVF 'Add-on' treatments, and with the media to analyses metal-hips and mesh problems. His international expertise in assessing evidence has been recognised by multiple global agencies including the WHO, US FDA and the UK government amongst others. He led the tamiflu systematic reviews, and he is Director of a World Health Organization Collabaration Centre in Self Care.

He is a founder of the AllTrials campaign, chaired WHO guidelines on self-care and CVD risk, is a co-PI on 4 mutli-centre RCTs and is chair of two NIHR Trial Steering Committees. Twice he has been voted one of the top 100 NHS clinical leaders by the HSJ. He is a board member of the NIHR School for Primary Care Research.

Carl is Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM). CEBM devotes a large proportion of its time to capacity building through outreach teaching and training activities.  He teaches undergraduates, postgraduates and teachers of EBM, and is the Director of Programs in Evidence-Based Health Care. The s program has approx. 100 MSc and 30 DPhil students. He also co-ordinates the Teaching Evidence-Based Practice week in Oxford, now in its 22nd year. The course has trained over a 1000 teachers worldwide.

He is Editor in Chief of the Journal BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, which has a dedicated blog site (BMJ EBM Spotlight) and twitter account @BMJ_EBM

Carl has over 300 peer reviewed publications and co-authored the EBM toolkit and Statistics Toolkit (BMJ-Blackwell’s) and, developed with the BMJ the ‘Doctors Toolbag’ iPhone application and the EvidenceLiveconference, now in its 7th year.

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Professor Ann Louise Kinmonth 

CBE, MA, MB, BChir, MSc, MD, FRCPCH. FRCP, FRCGP, FMedSci
Emeritus Professor of General Practice, Fellow and Director of Clinical Studies, St John's College, Cambridge

Ann Louise Kinmonth studied for her MD in the University Department of Paediatrics in Oxford, completed her vocational training in the Berinsfield Practice in 1982 and moved to a Principalship in General Practice at the Aldermoor Health Centre in Southampton in 1983. She was Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader and Professor in Primary Medical Care in the University of Southampton between 1983 and 1996 and moved to the University of Cambridge in 1997.

Research interests include the prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease patient-centred care, and trials of complex behavioural interventions.

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Professor Debbie Sharp

MA, BM,BCh(Oxon), PhD(Lond), FRCGP, DRCOG

Professor of Primary Care, University of Bristol

Professor Debbie Sharp is Professor of Primary Health Care in the Centre for Academic Primary Care at the University of Bristol. She was previously Lecturer and then Senior Lecturer at the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy’s and St Thomas’ in the Department of General Practice, and Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry.

In 1985 she obtained one of the first Mental Health Foundation GP Research Training Fellowships through which she completed a PhD on emotional disorders associated with childbirth in a cohort of women in South London, supervised by Professors Michael Shepherd and David Morrell. This cohort was subsequently followed up until the children were 25 years old. During her 11 years in South London, she was a partner (the first woman) at the Lambeth Road Group Practice - the academic practice attached to St Thomas' Hospital. She developed additional research interests in women's health in particular breast cancer screening and more generic interests in primary care mental health.

She took up the foundation chair in Primary Health Care in Bristol in 1994, the first woman to be appointed to a substantive chair in medicine in Bristol and built up a world-class department over the next sixteen years.

One of her greatest successes has been developing a cohort of young academic GPs and seeing them flourish. She took the Centre for Academic Primary Care into the NIHR School for Primary Care where it has continued to prosecute internationally recognised research.

WORKSHOPS 

We will be hosting a range of interactive workshops across the two days, focusing on specific topics such as medical education or behaviour medicine as well as others designed to help you get the most from your ACF years and beyond. Confirmed workshop leads include: 

 

Paul Aveyard

Professor Paul Aveyard

PhD MRCP FRCGP FFPH

Professor of Behavioural Medicine, University of Oxford

My research focuses on behavioural medicine. This is the intergration of biological, psychological and sociological knowledge to prevent and treat disease and to aid rehabilitation.

My work focuses on helping people change their behaviour, either to prevent serious disease, or as a treatment for that disease.  

A lot of my work has examined interventions to help people stop or reduce their smoking and lately I have worked in helping people manage their weight if they have become obese.  

People often use several drugs to help them stop smoking but our research suggested that combining these drugs does not help more than taking only one of them.  Our research has shown that people who stop smoking put on a considerable amount of weight and we are investigating the best ways to prevent this weight gain but without harming the chance of stopping smoking.  One of our trials showed that people who were referred to commercial weight management providers lost more weight than people who tried to lose weight without support.  However, people who went to their GP or practice nurse for support did no better than people trying without support.  This result helped change government policy and local health organisations now contract with commercial weight providers.

I work with several other organisations to improve health and healthcare.  I am former president of the UK Society of Behavioural Medicine, a former trustee of the Association for the Study of Obesity, a member of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco.  I am a senior editor of the journal Addiction.  I have worked on several NICE working groups and advised the Department of Health on smoking and obesity.

Becks Fisher

Dr Rebecca Fisher

MA MBBS MRCGP MRCP FHEA 

Having graduated from St Johns College Cambridge in 2010 with distinction and the Roger Morris prize for medicine, Becks spent her foundation years in Cambridge before trading dreaming spires to head to Oxford and an NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship in Primary Care, completed in August 2016.

Becks has held numerous teaching roles, most recently as a Doll Fellow at Green Templeton College, Oxford. She collaborated with a colleague to initiate and run a successful ‘vivas for finals’ teaching programme in Cambridge, an evidence based medicine programme for GP trainees in Oxford, and set up an access scheme for state schools in Oxford city. With a research interest in out of hours primary care Becks has published and presented widely and internationally, as well as completing a diploma in health research.

Becks is passionate about the social determinants of health and views health policy as a tool for social justice. She is hoping to improve her understanding of health economics, policy analysis and improvement science in order to play a meaningful future role in the delivery of high quality healthcare to all. Most recently she has completed a year as a National Medical Director’s Clinical Fellow at the Health Foundation, working predominantly within the Improvement Directorate.

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Dr Fiona Godlee

Editor in Chief of The BMJ

Fiona Godlee has been The BMJ's editor in chief since 2005.

She qualified as a doctor in 1985, trained as a general physician in Cambridge and London, and is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians. Since joining The BMJ in 1990 she has written on a broad range of issues, including the impact of environmental degradation on health, the future of the World Health Organization, the ethics of academic publication, and the problems of editorial peer review. In 1994 she spent a year at Harvard University as a Harkness fellow, evaluating efforts to bridge the gap between medical research and practice.

On returning to the UK, she led the development of BMJ Clinical Evidence, which evaluates the best available evidence on the benefits and harms of treatments and is now provided in 9 languages worldwide to over a million clinicians. In 2000 she moved to Current Science Group to establish the open access online publisher BioMed Central as editorial director for medicine. In 2003 she returned to BMJ to head up its new Knowledge division. She has served as president of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and chair of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and is co-editor of Peer Review in Health Sciences.

Trish Greenhalgh

Professor Trish Greenhalgh

Professor of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford

Trish Greenhalgh is an internationally recognised academic in primary health care and trained as a GP. She joined the Department in January 2015 after previously holding professorships at University College London and Queen Mary University of London.

As co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Research In Health Sciences (IRIHS) unit, Trish leads a programme of research at the interface between social sciences and medicine, with strong emphasis on the organisation and delivery of health services. Her research seeks to celebrate and retain the traditional and humanistic aspects of medicine while also embracing the unparalleled opportunities of contemporary science and technology to improve health outcomes and relieve suffering. 

Trish is joint module coordinator on the Knowledge Into Action (KIA) module of the MSc in Evidence Based Health Care.

Her past research has covered the evaluation and improvement of clinical services at the primary-secondary care interface, particularly the use of narrative methods to illuminate the illness experience in ‘hard to reach’ groups; the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice (including the study of knowledge translation and research impact); the adoption and use of new technologies (including electronic patient records and assisted living technologies) by both clinicians and patients; and the application of philosophy to clinical practice.  

Dan Lasserson

Professor Dan Lasserson

MA MBBS (HONS) MD FRCP (EDIN) MRCGP

Professor of Ambulatory Care, University of Birmingham

Professor Dan Lasserson is the only Professor of Ambulatory Care in the UK. His research group tackles one of the biggest challenges that healthcare is facing – the delivery of acute medical care, where needs are increasing year by year but the available resources to meet those needs are limited. Both primary and secondary care acute services are increasingly stretched and calls for new models of acute care have come from NHS England, the Royal College of Physicians and the Primary Care Workforce Commission.

Dan Richards-Doran

Mr Dan Richards-Doran

BSc (Hons) DipSciComm MCIPR CIPR Accredited PR Practitioner

Communications Manager

In the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences I am responsible for the department's research communications and supporting researchers to communicate their work and its impact to our local, national and international stakeholders. I manage activities that seek to develop our audiences and engage them with our work, as well as delivering coaching and support to our research team. I work closely with the Public Affairs Directorate, the Medical Sciences Division office and other communications staff across the University of Oxford and Oxford's health research organisations.

I have worked in science communication and public engagement for over ten years, having worked previously for the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research managing press, communications and public engagement, and at the British Science Association, where I managed National Science & Engineering Week and the volunteer-led regional programme of public events. I also have commercial experience as a life sciences conference producer.

I have a BSc in medical microbiology and a postgraduate diploma in science communication. I am a Member of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, an Accredited PR Practitioner and am currently studying for a diploma in public relations.

Clare Taylor

Dr Clare Taylor

MBE MA MPH PhD FRCGP

NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer, University of Oxford

Heart failure is my main research interest. My doctoral work examined the clinical pathway for patients diagnosed with heart failure in primary care, particularly the epidemiology of heart failure in the community and the patient experience of diagnosis. I am co-Principal Investigator for the REFer for EchocaRadiogram (REFER) study which examines the use of a clinical decision rule and natriuretic peptide testing in the diagnosis of heart failure in primary care. I am also part of the Echocardiographic Heart Of England Screening (ECHOES) study team. The ECHOES-X study rescreened patients from the original ECHOES cohort to determine the outcome of heart failure in a community population. Internationally, I am collaborating with the University of Sydney to examine the burden of heart failure in Australian general practice.

My other research interest is atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation. I have used routinely collected general practice data to examine the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and management of oral anticoagulants in primary care, and been involved in a randomised controlled trial in stroke patients. I am an experienced lecturer at Masters level, GP tutor and senior clinical examiner for undergraduates and a trained mentor.

SPCR