After a hugely successful year as ST3 Medical Education Fellows with the Primary Care and Graduate Entry teams, Dr Hayley Parkes and Dr Jack Amiry both had posters accepted at this year’s RCGP conference. Here, they reflect on their Fellowship year and their participation in the conference.

Photos of Hayley and Jack overlayed with a stock image of an online meeting. Includes the RCGP logo.

Dr Hayley Parkes: 

Towards the end of my year as a Medical Education Fellow, I began looking for chances to shout from the rooftops about my fantastic opportunity. I wanted to encourage as many other candidates with an interest in Medical Education to pursue something similar. Covid-19 did its best to thwart that, so when I saw that the RCGP was putting on a virtual conference I wanted to create a poster describing my experiences. I was keen to show off the opportunities I had been given and the skills I gained throughout the year. I was delighted to have my poster accepted. 

Writing the poster was a great opportunity for me to reflect on my time with the Undergraduate Primary Care Teaching Group. After my maternity leave finishes, I am excited to get back to working with the team (if only virtually). I hope that my poster will have inspired trainees at the conference to consider applying for similar roles during their training. I also hope that Trainers, Program Directors and Heads of GP Training will have seen the poster and will consider offering a Medical Education Fellowship to their trainees.

View Hayley’s poster

Dr Jack Amiry:

Whilst the Fellowship had an enormous impact on me and my career-goals, before starting I really couldn't say what it was going to involve in any detail. I created the poster for the RCGP conference because I wanted to clarify the details of the experience from several points of view (Trainee, Educational Supervisor, Fellowship Supervisor), so that anyone keen to undertake, supervise or create these posts in the future might feel more confident to do so.

The conference itself was a lot of fun. I think the digital interface was genuinely done brilliantly, but the flexibility ended up being an interesting double-edged sword. While it was great to be able to quickly dip in and out of different talks without needing to "excuse-me" my way past a whole row of people, I ended up multi-tasking - doing admin and clinical work during the time of the conference. This meant it was more difficult to get really immersed in the experience.

View Jack's poster

Opinions expressed are those of the author/s and not of the University of Oxford. Readers' comments will be moderated - see our guidelines for further information.

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