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Close-up of stethoscope sat around a globe © Shutterstock

We’d like to extend a very warm welcome to our new students!

On Monday 12 September, The Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences welcomed its first cohort of students onto the new MSc in Global Healthcare Leadership.

As the world is faced with multiple health challenges, including an ageing population, multimorbidity and health inequalities, we designed this multidisciplinary programme to address the need for experienced leaders to tackle these challenges head-on and make a difference in people’s lives is urgent.

In partnership with Saïd Business School, this MSc focuses on the individual, organisational and systematic perspective, designed to equip experienced leaders with the skills required to deliver affordable, effective and efficient healthcare in complex global systems.

When asked about the success of launching the course and recruiting its first intake, Academic Director, Professor Kamal Mahtani, commented, “We were delighted to welcome 35 students to the new MSc Global Healthcare Leadership. Our students bring a diverse set of skills and experiences to this cohort, with 21 different nationalities represented, over 10 different professional industries and 590 years of cumulative work and leadership experience. We look forward to being part of their individual and collective leadership journeys.”

Following the students’ introductory week here at Oxford, Programme Director, Oscar Lyons, reflected on the experience with pride: “There was an air of excitement throughout the week. The conversations were enthusiastic, with new connections forming bridges across geographic, institutional and vocational backgrounds. Everyone was focused on getting the most out of their time here in Oxford, and they threw themselves into the classroom as well as the enrichment activities with gusto – they went on a walking tour, college dinners, self-organised class dinners and breakfasts, and made the most of their coffee breaks and lunches. We were delighted to see the diversity of background and of thought that people brought into the room, and the curiosity that they brought with them. It made for a vibrant, open and exciting week.”

Following completion of the first module, we asked students to reflect on what they found most useful. Common responses related to networking opportunities, the encouragement of self-reflection, and learning new frameworks and methodologies. We also had very positive feedback on the instructors with one student commenting, “[The instructor] was excellent in setting the scene from the pre-reads, to refreshing the contexts, generating discussions, summarising salient points and tying them back to teachings. They had very great cues that brought things together in a coherent way that supports learning and reflection.” And another stating, “Honesty one of the best professors I’ve ever had. [The instructor] was so engaging and really pulls meaningful points, reflections, and learnings out of every class discussion so that we balance grasping the key concepts (clarity) and the application of them. I feel like I could summarize what [they’ve taught] us easily without having to dig through my notes”

And on that note, we’d like to formally welcome our new cohort.

We wish our students the very best for the coming months.

Have fun, be inspired, and stay curious.

 

For more information about the MSc in Global Healthcare Leadership please visit our webpage

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