Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Background: Primary care databases contain cardiovascular disease risk factor data, but practical tools are required to Improve identification of at-risk patients. Aim: To test the effects of a system of electronic reminders (the 'e-Nudge') on cardiovascular events and the adequacy of data for cardiovascular risk estimation. Design of study: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nineteen general practices in the West Midlands, UK. Method: The e-Nudge identifies four groups of patients aged over 50 years on the basis of estimated cardiovascular risk and adequacy of risk factor data in general practice computers. Screen messages highlight individuals at raised risk and prompt users to complete risk profiles where necessary. The proportion of the study population in the four groups was measured, as well as the rate of cardiovascular events in each arm after 2 years. Results: Over 38 000 patients' electronic records were randomised. The intervention led to an increase in the proportion of patients with sufficient data who were identifiably at risk, with a difference of 1.94% compared to the control group (95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.38 to 2.50, P < 0.001). A corresponding reduction occurred in the proportion potentially at risk but requiring further data for a risk estimation (difference = -3.68%, 95% Cl = -4.53 to -2.84, P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the incidence of cardiovascular events (rate ratio = 0.96, 95% Cl = 0.85 to 1.10, P = 0.59). Conclusion: Automated electronic reminders using routinely collected primary care data can improve the adequacy of cardiovascular risk factor information during everyday practice and increase the visibility of the at-risk population. ©British Journal of General Practice.

Original publication

DOI

10.3399/bjgp10X483904

Type

Journal article

Journal

British Journal of General Practice

Publication Date

01/04/2010

Volume

60

Pages

251 - 256