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While it seems intuitively appealing to promote participation in regular exercise in the management of irritable bowel syndrome, limited randomised controlled trial evidence exists to support this recommendation. We examined the feasibility and effects of an exercise intervention upon quality of life and irritable bowel symptoms using a randomised controlled trial methodology. Patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome according to Rome II criteria were randomised to either an exercise consultation intervention or usual care for 12 weeks. Outcomes included irritable bowel specific quality of life, symptoms (total symptoms, constipation, diarrhoea and pain) and exercise participation. The recruitment rate of eligible patients identified from hospital records was 18.3% (56/305). Analyses revealed no differences in quality life scores between groups at 12-week follow-up. The exercise group reported significantly improved symptoms of constipation (mean difference = 10.9, 95% CI = -20.1, -1.6) compared to usual care at follow-up. The intervention group participated in significantly more exercise than usual care at follow-up (mean difference = 21.6, 95% CI = 9.4, 33.8). Recruitment of eligible patients into this study was possible but rates were low. Findings highlight the possibility that exercise may be an effective intervention for symptom management in patients with irritable bowel syndrome; this may be particularly the case for constipation predominant patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

Original publication

DOI

10.1055/s-2008-1038600

Type

Journal article

Journal

International Journal of Sports Medicine

Publication Date

01/09/2008

Volume

29

Pages

778 - 782