Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

© 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Background/Objectives:Coincident with economic development, China has experienced a marked transition from undernutrition to overweight/obesity over the last few decades. We aimed to explore the burden of under- and overnutrition and nutrient adequacy among 2-12-year-old Chinese children.Subjects/Methods:We included anthropometry, dietary intake and biomarkers from 2-12-year-olds who participated in the 2009-2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey (n=1191 in 2009; n=1648 in 2011). Dietary intakes were compared with the 2013 Chinese Dietary Recommended Intakes.Results:In 2011, ∼19% of 2-6-year-old children were underweight, 4% were stunted, 10% were overweight and 12% were obese. Among 7-12-year-old children, stunting was almost 0%, whereas ∼21% were underweight, 13% were overweight and 6% were obese in 2011. Overweight and obesity were more prevalent among children from urban areas and higher income households. In particular, 2-6-year-old children from urban areas and higher income households experienced the highest increase in obesity from 2009 to 2011 (P < 0.05). Children from urban areas and higher income households had overall higher intakes of total daily energy and most macro- and micronutrients (P < 0.05). However, a significant proportion of children did not meet the recommendations for important micronutrients.Conclusions:Underweight and stunting currently coexist with overweight and obesity among Chinese children < 12-year-old. We found critical disparities in the prevalence of under- and overweight/obesity, as well as in nutrient intakes and dietary adequacies between children from different incomes, revealing that the burden of childhood under- and overnutrition may constitute a public health concern in modern China.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/ejcn.2015.106

Type

Journal article

Journal

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date

01/12/2015

Volume

69

Pages

1323 - 1329