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Please note that these are simply potential project ideas - no specific funding is attached. For information on funding please see here. Applicants are also welcome to submit their own project ideas.

Those wishing to apply for one the below projects will still need to submit their own research proposal. Your proposal should expand on the basic outline published below and should demonstrate: your knowledge and skills in the area; your ideas of how to approach the topic; any areas of your specific interest within the broader area specified and how you see the project developing during the course of your DPhil.

Producing your own, more detailed, research proposal gives you the opportunity to demonstrate your strengths more extensively than on a CV or application form and is a good way for you to make a strong impression on the selection panel.

Please check our course pages here for entry requirements and details on how to apply. If you have any questions about the process, please contact our Postgraduate Training Administrator, Daniel Long (daniel.long@phc.ox.ac.uk); for questions about the projects, please contact supervisors directly.

Digital health interventions for long-term conditions

Understanding factors affecting wide-scale implementation of digital health interventions to improve health and health care delivery for long-term conditions

Supervisors: Dr Williams and Prof Farmer

Project description

This project is part of a series of projects that aim to use data from wearables and other monitoring devices to track the health of people with long-term conditions such as diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  Randomized clinical trials and qualitative research provide information about how people use these devices and can benefit from them. However, less is known about how people use these devices, how it affects their relationship with clinicians, and how the work of clinicians (from hospitals through to the community) might change.

The main focus of your work will be to gain an understanding of the context of, and potential barriers to, implementation of digital devices (e.g. smartphones and tablet computers) linked to monitoring devices such as blood glucose meters and pulse oximeters) in routine clinical practice in the community.  The study will provide an opportunity to develop skills in mixed methods research, including planning a protocol for a study, collecting and analysing data and preparing reports for publication. You will be required to critically appraise relevant literature from the field, as well as collecting original data from interviews and surveys with a range of clinicians and patients who are taking part in studies or service implementation projects using digital devices. You therefore need to demonstrate an ability to get on well with people, excellent communication skills, critical appraisal and an ability to travel.

You will be based with the long-term conditions group at the Nuffield Department for Primary Care Health Sciences (NDPCHS) that undertakes a range of clinical research studies, in collaboration with the Department of Engineering Science, focused on developing interventions based on novel digital devices. You will have the opportunity to work with an interdisciplinary team whose research aims bring together clinical academics, engineers, industry, social scientists and patient representatives in order to produce world-leading research into digital health.

You will be supervised by Dr Williams who has a wide range of experience of qualitative methodologies in evaluating digital health interventions, and Prof Farmer, a senior investigator in NDPCHS who has extensive experience of development of digital health interventions for evaluation in clinical trials.

Training

Dr Williams works closely with the Health Experiences Research Group who provide a wide range of training opportunities.  Training will be provided in qualitative and mixed methods, critical appraisal, writing skills and there will be the opportunity for networking across a wide range of relevant disciplines.

Students will attend weekly seminars in the department and those relevant in the wider university. Students will be expected to present data regularly to the department, other collaborating groups in the University, and to attend conferences to present their data.

Recommended reading:

  • Implementation of digital health – an overview
  • Vassilev, I. et al. Assessing the implementability of telehealth interventions for self-management support: a realist review. Implement Sci 10, 59–59 (2015).
  • Previous work from the group on use of digital health
  • Williams, V., Price, J., Hardinge, M., Tarassenko, L. & Farmer, A. Using a mobile health application to support self-management in COPD: a qualitative study. Br.J.Gen.Pract. 64, e392–400 (2014).
  • A study evaluating integration of new approaches within clinical services
  • Drew, S. et al. Implementation of secondary fracture prevention services after hip fracture: a qualitative study using extended Normalization Process Theory. Implement Sci 10, 57 (2015).

Digital health

Digital health is often described as having the potential to revolutionise patient care and offer solutions to challenges of increasing demand and diminishing resources. Technologies such as electronic health records, decisions support tools and digital imaging systems permeate modern healthcare settings. This commitment to digital health now extends to patient-facing technologies for self-monitoring and self-management, for example smartphone apps, wearables or other sensor-based devices. More recently, big data and artificial intelligence have been deemed the new frontier in diagnosis and personalisation of care.

This increasingly diverse technological landscape provides opportunities to critically study the role of technology in healthcare, with a strong focus on primary care. Potential DPhil topics could be developed in the following areas (although not exclusively), depending on the interests and background of interested applicants:

  • Experiences of patients and health professionals in using digital health solutions and technologically-supported health services.
  • Organisational aspects of digital health and re-configuration of work practices.
  • Co-design of digital health and iterative co-production of technologically-enabled services.
  • Methodological approaches for the evaluation of digital health interventions (e.g. examining the role of pragmatic trials).
  • Collaboration and engagement between industry and the health service on digital health
  • Scaling up and rolling out technological innovations.
  • Policy and regulatory changes supporting digital health.
  • Use of the internet in health and healthcare.

We are seeking applicants interested in developing expertise in the social and organisational study of digital health. Some experience in this area along with an understanding of qualitative methods would be desirable. The successful candidate would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences) research unit where there is significant expertise in undertaking qualitative research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. The group is well placed to provide guidance and collaboration on qualitative approaches, as well as expertise in theoretical perspectives such as socio-material studies, science and technology studies and computer-supported cooperative work.

The DPhil project will be linked to research undertaken as part of the SCALS programme and other work carried out in the unit.

Supervision would be provided by Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi and, depending on the topic selected, Professor Trish Greenhalgh and/or Dr Sara Shaw; with opportunities to link with other teams working on digital health within the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences (for example the Health Experiences Research Group) and other units in Oxford such as the Oxford Internet Institute and the Computer Science Department.

Interested applicants are welcome to contact Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi for more information: chrysanthi.papoutsi@phc.ox.ac.uk.

DIGITAL HEALTH SELF-MANAGEMENT

The NHS is increasingly harnessing digital health tools as integral parts of health care. Digital health self-management resources including apps and interactive websites are increasing at a huge rate.  However, we still do not know how people with long-term physical and/or mental health conditions engage with these as part of everyday life and use these to manage their health and negotiate their care over a long period. The focus of this DPhil project would be to explore and understand how people use digital health self-management resources within a real world context over time. It will require a qualitative or mixed methods research design. 

Supervisors: Prof John Powell and Dr Veronika Williams 

Online patient feedback

Online patient feedback is an increasingly popular phenomenon, mirroring practices in other industries in which ratings and reviews have a significant amount of power. However, we do not know how this type of feedback is perceived, used or responded to in primary care. This DPhil project is a multi-site ethnography to explore online feedback in general practice from the perspectives of numerous key stakeholder, including receptionists, practice managers, nurses, GPs and patients. 

Supervisors: Prof John Powell & Dr Anne-Marie Boylan

Virtual online consultations

Under the umbrella of the Department’s Digital Health strategy, a number of studies have focused on the virtual online consulting, using Skype, FaceTime and similar technologies to develop alternatives to traditional face-to-face consultations. Two separate studies (Virtual Online Consultations: Advantages and Limitations, and Studies in Co-creating Assisted Living Technologies) have generated over 40 recordings of virtual consultations in diabetes, cancer and heart failure (providing a readily available dataset for more detailed analysis, e.g. using

linguistic techniques), and work is on-going to explore how this model of service delivery might develop and extend further across the NHS, working with service users, clinicians, NHS providers and policymakers to explore the potential for spread and scale-up of virtual consultations in the wider NHS. 

We welcome applications from students with strong interests in any of the above, along with familiarity in social science informed approaches to research (e.g. those interested in analysis of virtual consultations would be expected to have interests in the analysis of interactive spoken discourse). Students would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research in the Health Sciences) research unit within the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences undertaking mixed-method research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. Depending on the research questions selected, supervision would be provided by Professor Trish Greenhalgh , a medical doctor, and/or Dr Sara Shaw, a social scientist; with opportunities to link with Dr Deborah Cameron, Professor of Language and Communication in the Faculty of Linguistics, Philology and Phonetics at Oxford.  Interested applicants are welcome to contact Sara Shaw.  

DPhils using realist research approaches

The Department has a growing interest and portfolio of research using realist approaches - namely realist evaluation and realist reviews (or synthesis). Through our competitively funded realist research projects we have built up unparalleled methodological expertise. In addition we are committed to nurturing the next generation of realist researchers - as reflected in our current DPhil students and Realist Review and Realist Evaluation module.

Ideally, potential applicants should have an interest in using realist research approaches in health services research and/or primary care. Applicants interested in undertaking a DPhil at Oxford in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences using realist research approaches are welcomed to contact Geoff Wong.

Weight management 

Developing interventions to increase the effectiveness of weight management interventions in primary care

Supervisors: Professor Susan Jebb and Dr Nerys Astbury

One quarter of adults in the UK are obese and of these, three-quarters are trying to lose weight.  Given the scale of the problem, there is an urgent need to offer effective interventions, at scale, to improve health outcomes.

We have recently shown that brief interventions in routine primary care can prompt people to take action to manage their weight. However there is a need to develop more effective approaches to support weight loss that can be offered and supported by generalist practitioners in a primary care setting, recognising that even modest weight loss brings important health benefits especially if delivered at scale.

In a systematic review we have shown that the use of meal replacements leads to greater weight loss than general dietary advice and this may be an approach that could be developed into an effective nurse-led programme.

The project is likely to include several of the following elements:

  • A systematic review of the dietary components and behaviour change techniques used in previous weight-loss interventions in routine settings.
  • Analysis of audio-recordings of current weight management interventions offered by practice nurses.
  • Development of a nurse-led meal replacement programme and/or alternative structured approaches to weight loss.
  • A feasibility study and process evaluation to test the fidelity of delivery and the early impact on body weight.

This project will include a strong element of public and patient involvement in the research and will provide opportunities for engagement with health professionals and policymakers

The student will join the diet and obesity group within the thriving Health Behaviours team in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. We are currently working on range of interventions in primary care and in the community to support people to change their food consumption, including behavioural interventions for weight loss and reductions in saturated fat or salt to reduce cardiovascular risk.

Antibiotic stewardship

Engaging community pharmacists with antibiotic stewardship

Applications are invited from individuals with a strong academic record who wish to develop a career in behaviour science and/or primary care research. The student will work within the Infectious Diseases Research Group led by Prof Chris Butler in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences and will become a member of Trinity College. This is a three year programme and will normally be taken up in October 2018.

The project

Antibiotic stewardship (AMS) requires encouraging populations to alter the way they use antibiotics so it is fundamentally a human behaviour change issue. Many behaviour change interventions have focussed on general practice, where the majority of antibiotics are prescribed. The focus is generally on reducing the use of antibiotics for acute, self-limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs), where antibiotics offer minimal or no benefit over and above self-care. Community-based interventions have targeted general practice staff, adult and child patients, and members of the public but, thus far, not community pharmacists. This is surprising since AMS strategies have directed the public to use pharmacies for advice about treatment of symptoms of acute illness.

Increasing understanding of antibiotic resistance and empowering people to self-care for RTIs requires clear and consistent messages. Pharmacists can enhance general practice by providing accessible management advice to patients with symptoms of infections and promoting appropriate antibiotic use. At the same time, advice should ensure those who are likely to receive meaningful benefit from antibiotics should receive them, serious illness should not be missed, and that safe care should be paramount.

This proposed research will develop an intervention to support community pharmacists to provide enhanced care for patients with symptoms of infections and to support their role as antibiotic stewards. This will involve;

  • A systematic review of literature investigating pharmacists’ attitudes and experiences of antibiotic stewardship activities.
  • An interview study exploring pharmacists’ views and experiences of AMS and a questionnaire exploring patients’ preferences for pharmacist-led healthcare.
  • The co-design of materials to support pharmacists to deliver evidence-based, safe, self-care advice to patients with RTI, tested in a feasibility study.

 The project will be supervised by Professor Chris Butler, who has an active interest in promoting prudent use of antimicrobials and Dr Sarah Tonkin-Crine, who has an active interest in understanding and modifying behaviours in relation to antibiotic consumption. 

Interested applicants should contact Chris Butler (christopher.butler@phc.ox.ac.uk) or Sarah Tonkin-Crine (sarah.tonkin-crine@phc.ox.ac.uk), enclosing a CV, to discuss the project and for advice on the application process.

Antimicrobial resistance

Measuring public attitudes to antimicrobial use and resistance

Applications are invited from individuals with a strong academic record who wish to develop a career in behaviour science and/or primary care research. The student will work within the Infectious Diseases Research Group led by Prof Chris Butler in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences and will become a member of Trinity College. This is a three year programme and will normally be taken up in October 2018.

The project

Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide health threat which leads to antimicrobials becoming ineffective for the treatment of serious infections. The prudent use of antibiotics is an urgent, worldwide public health priority.  To date health campaigns have sought to increase public knowledge of appropriate antibiotic use and to reduce patient expectations for antibiotics for certain infections. Several studies, across various countries, have sought to identify public knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics but no standard, validated measure has been developed.

This doctoral research program will involve the development and validation of an instrument to measure the knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and practice of individual’s towards antimicrobial use and resistance. This will involve a programme of work which involves both quantitative and qualitative skills. The proposed outline for the project includes three components, although this may be flexible according to early findings and the students’ own ideas.

  • Study 1: A systematic review of existing approaches for measuring public knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and behaviour towards antimicrobial use.
  • Study 2: Qualitative work to explore individuals’ understanding of antibiotics and to develop questionnaire items which are meaningful to members of the public through cognitive interviewing. This work will consider antibiotic consumption in an international context.
  • Study 3: The development and testing of an instrument to measure public knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning antimicrobial use in a variety of contexts.

The outcome of the project will provide a valuable resource for future research and help to identify the impact of interventions and campaigns targeted at reducing unnecessary antimicrobial consumption.

The project will be supervised by Professor Chris Butler, who has an active interest in promoting prudent use of antimicrobials and Dr Sarah Tonkin-Crine, who has an active interest in understanding and modifying behaviours in relation to antibiotic consumption. Professor Sarah Walker, Nuffield Department of Medicine, will advise on statistical matters including psychometric approaches.

Interested applicants should contact Chris Butler (christopher.butler@phc.ox.ac.uk) or Sarah Tonkin-Crine (sarah.tonkin-crine@phc.ox.ac.uk), enclosing a CV, to discuss the project and for advice on the application process.

Cardiovascular disease

Stratifying medicines for prevention of cardiovascular disease in Primary Care

Supervisors: James Sheppard, tbc

This is an exciting opportunity to join a new research group exploring how to apply personalised medicine to the prevention of cardiovascular disease in Primary Care. The group focuses on better understanding the risks and benefits of taking blood pressure, cholesterol and antiplatelet medications, permitting better targeting of treatment at those with the most to gain, whilst at the same time reducing over-treatment in otherwise healthy individuals.

The DPhil candidate will be expected to work up a project within this theme, using large primary care databases to study the safety and efficacy of treatment, the applicability of trial data to real world settings and develop risk prediction models examining the likelihood of benefit and harms to therapy.

Smoking cessation

Developing and testing peer-led interventions to promote switching from smoking to vaping

Applications are invited from individuals with a strong academic record who wish to develop a career in behavioural or primary care research. The student will join the thriving Health Behaviours team in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences who are working on range of interventions to support harm reduction and smoking cessation.

The project

The rise in popularity of e-cigarettes in recent years has been accompanied by a growth in the number of virtual ‘vaper’ communities, with people sharing their advice and experiences of e-cigarettes with peers on internet support groups and discussion forums, many of which address ways of reducing or stopping smoking.  The rise of peer to peer support is unique to e-cigarettes; no other means of stopping or reducing smoking attracts such passionate engagement from members of the public.  This raises the possibility that we could better harness this peer support to enable more people to reduce or stop smoking using e-cigarettes and this project examines this.

The first study in this project will be a systematic review looking at the effects of online peer support for harm reduction and smoking cessation. The aim will be to systematically identify studies using online peer support for harm reduction or smoking cessation; to review the key characteristics of these peer groups to determine the mechanisms by which and the extent to which they change users’ smoking; and to assess their methodological quality.

The second study will use data collected from the MaSC trial to understand the experiences of peer supporters and new e-cigarette users. The MaSC trial is a three-year programme incorporating a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of GP and nurse promotion of e-cigarettes for promoting use and uptake of e-cigarettes in smokers with smoking-related chronic diseases. Patients in the trial have no intention of stopping smoking but are given an e-cigarette by their GP or nurse in an attempt to switch from cigarettes to e-cigarettes. Those who accept the offer of an e-cigarette are given access to a telephone helpline and a study-dedicated online support forum led by experienced vapers. This study will involve a content-driven analysis of data from the online peer support forum and audio-recordings of the telephone support to identify what concerns new vapers have and how they respond to reassurances offered by peer supporters, and to understand which components of support are effective and how this can be maximised. In-depth qualitative interviews will be conducted with peer supporters from the MaSC trial to explore their approach to interacting with and supporting new users. Interviews will also be conducted with new potential vapers to understand their experiences of online peer support and reasons for using the online support forum.

Building on the first and second study, the third study will involve developing and testing a vaping support website featuring an online peer-led support forum for new vapers. The study will assess how many new users opt in and use the forum and switch from cigarettes to e-cigarettes and the value of peer support.

 Supervisors: Dr Rachna Begh and Professor Paul Aveyard and Dr John Powell

Interested applicants should, in the first instance, discuss their interest with Dr Rachna Begh at rachna.begh@phc.ox.ac.uk and attach a CV. 

PPI/E

Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement in Health Research

‘Patient and public involvement and engagement’ in research (PPI/E) is increasingly accepted as a principle (it is fair and reasonable to consult and involve patients about research into their condition) and as a quality driver (if patients and citizens are involved, the research may be of a higher standard and/or more relevant and implementable). But whilst PPI/E is widely accepted as something that researchers ‘ought’ to do, significant challenges remain in actually involving and engaging with patients and citizens and in the meaningful integration of patient and citizen perspectives into health research.  The question remains: why does involving patients and citizens in health research remain so hard?

Applicants are invited to submit a proposal in any area relating to the field of patient and public involvement and engagement in health research, including (but are not limited to):

How should the presumption that we ought to do PPI/E be justified? How does ‘why we ought to do it’ influence how it should be done?

How do lay members experience their involvement – and how might their contribution be maximised?  Whose voices are never or rarely heard when ‘PPI’ consultations happen – and how might these biases be redressed? 

What is a public consultation for and how should it function? How should we think of the relationship between publicly accountable processes of decision-making and the requirement that the public are consulted?

What are the ethical challenges of PPI/E and PPI/E initiatives – and how might we overcome them?

Students would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research in the Health Sciences) research unit within the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences undertaking mixed-method research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. Supervision would be provided by Professor Trish Greenhalgh  and a senior member of her team (negotiable and depending on the topic selected).  The project will also link with Dr Mark Sheehan, expert in research ethics from the Oxford ETHOX centre and Oxford Biomedical Research Centre.

Knowledge mobilisation in primary care

The NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre hosts a new stream of work on Partnerships, Health Wealth and Innovation, which includes looking closely at the translation, mobilisation and co-creation of knowledge. 

Knowledge translation is a relatively new term that is used to describe an old problem, that of translating research findings into changes in practice. It is critically important in primary care where, for example, considerable guidance exists with respect to childhood immunizations, diabetes care or use of technology in general practice, yet variations in the organisation, delivery and experience of care remain. Contemporary approaches to getting research into practice have questioned the term “knowledge translation” as it tends to  equate ‘knowledge’ with objective, impersonal research findings; see ‘knowledge’ and ‘practice’ as cleanly separated both empirically and analytically; and take clinical practice as a series of rational decisions on which scientific research findings can be brought to bear. Other terms are now preferred, including knowledge mobilisation (with the emphasis on how knowledge is actively put to use) or even knowledge co-creation (the idea that people are more likely to use research knowledge if they themselves have been involved in generating it).

We are seeking an applicant who is interested in exploring any aspect of knowledge mobilisation or knowledge co-creation in relation to primary care including (but not restricted to): developing theory about how and why knowledge is best produced, shared, used, developed or overlooked; co-creating knowledge in collaboration with service users of other stakeholders; examining the ways in which knowledge can shape action in different contexts; and measuring the success and effects of knowledge translation, mobilisation or co-creation projects.

Candidates should be familiar with the basics of knowledge translation, mobilisation and/or co-creation in a healthcare setting and have experience in qualitative and/or mixed methods approaches.  Students would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research In Health Sciences) research unit within the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences undertaking mixed-method research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. Depending on the research questions selected, supervision would be provided by Professor Trish Greenhalgh , a medical doctor, Dr Kamal Mahtani, a practising GP and/or Dr Alex Rushforth, a social scientist. Interested applicants are welcome to contact Professor Greenhalgh. 

Asthma

Understanding asthma classification in general practice

The life sciences are often seen as a touchstone of improved health and economic growth, with billions of pounds of public and private money invested annually in health research in universities and industry. Despite the emergence of new health technologies and approaches, the evidence upon which the uptake of innovations in primary care is meant to be based is still routinely criticised. One reason is that clinical guidelines and published literature are often said to be too far removed from the everyday practices and experiences of medical professionals and patients.

Focusing on recent changes in the classification of asthma proposed in new NICE Guidelines, this ethnographic project will examine how the novel classification approach is reshaping the diagnosis and treatment of patients with airways complaints in everyday General Practice settings and will elicit the perspectives of GPs on the effectiveness and practicalities of the proposed new systems.

The ideal candidate is someone keen to develop social science expertise in the context of T2 translational research and evidence based healthcare, preferably already with some background knowledge of the promises and challenges of knowledge translation and qualitative methods. The successful candidate would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences) research unit where there is significant expertise in undertaking mixed-method research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. The group is well placed to offer guidance and collaboration on qualitative or mixed methods approaches, as well as expertise on theoretical perspectives such as diffusion of innovations, implementation science, and science and technology studies.

Supervision will be provided by Dr. Alex Rushforth and a senior member of the IRIHS team. The project will benefit from close collaboration with Dr. Sietse Wieringa, a GP and DPhil student with expertise on implementation science and guideline development. Those interested are welcome to contact Dr Rushforth.

Efforts to bring transparency to clinical drugs trials

A central challenge at the heart of health research policy concerns how research can offer the greatest possible chance of improving health and meeting fundamental needs of healthcare systems, whilst supporting economic growth. Problems perennially identified in the context of clinical research include the lack of transparency and openness, which can undermine trust and credibility in research outcomes and evidence. Indeed vested interests can mean that although the large majority of clinical drugs trials fail, the failures and reasons for such failures are seldom revealed. This has led to claims that health research in general – and clinical research in particular – is beset by problems of waste (Chalmers et al 2014).

In response to such concerns, an international public-private partnership (PPP) platform is currently attempting to establish clinical trials performed entirely in the open. This DPhil project offers a talented qualitative researcher the opportunity to study the challenges and obstacles faced in trying to make this vision a reality. The successful candidate will help to build a theoretically informed, ethnographic project on obstacles, failures and successes the PPP encounters in trying to make clinical research more transparent and in deviating from typical forms of academic-pharmaceutical research partnerships. 

We welcome students with strong interest in qualitative, social science informed research, with basic knowledge of how medical research is organized. Students would be based in the IRIHS (Interdisciplinary Research in Health Sciences) research unit within the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences undertaking mixed-method research at the interface between social sciences and medicine. The group has close working relations with the PPP discussed above. Anyone wishing to discuss a potential study is welcome to contact Dr. Alex Rushforth.

Experiences of cancer and palliative/end-of-life care

Social, political, and ethical dimensions shaping peoples’ experiences and understandings of cancer and/or palliative and end-of-life care

John MacArtney is a sociologist whose research focuses on the social, political, and ethical dimensions shaping peoples’ experiences and understandings of cancer and/or palliative and end-of-life care. His work is empirically grounded, draws on social and political theory, and is inter-disciplinary – involving collaborations with clinicians, health researchers, and colleagues from across social science disciplines. John has used a range of qualitative methods in his work, including narrative interviews and analysis, discourse analysis, and ethnography. He is happy to discuss potential projects with any prospective students.

Supervisor: John MacArtney