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Jeanet Blom

Jeanet is researcher at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. Her medical training at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, was followed by her training for general practitioner and epidemiology training in Rotterdam. After several years of working as a general practitioner and her thesis in 2005: 'Malignancy and venous thrombosis' at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology in the Leiden University Medical Center, she proceeded doing research at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care.

She participates in the research program of the Department of Public Health and Primary Care 'geriatrics in primary care'. The overall aim of the research program is to improve (the organization of) medical care for all older persons outside the hospital by building up scientific knowledge and evidence. Improvement of quality of life and daily functioning of older people is the main starting point of research. Her research at this department covers a wide range of subjects important in primary care, such as cardiovascular prevention in the elderly, verifying traditional risk scores (Framingham, SCORE) and studying new risk markers (homocysteine); a case-control study studying risk-factors for venous thrombosis in the elderly.

Currently she is leading a project on guided care for the elderly in primary care into the effect of monitoring of functioning of the elderly and a subsequent care plan and a project on discontinuing cardiovascular preventive medication as a consequence of new guideline implementation.

 

 

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The focus of my past research has been on respiratory tract infections (RTI) with the emphasis on lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in general practice. Finding solutions to improve prescribing decisions and seeking opportunities to facilitate antimicrobial stewardship has been the main goal of my research until now.

The current research line will be extended to common infections in primary care, enhanced communication skills, medication adherence and point of care diagnostic testing in general. I aim to further develop my research qualities and to work towards building a research group focused on performing high quality research into illness- and disease-focused solutions to common conditions in general practice. The objective is to work trans-disciplinary within and beyond medicine.

As the clinical agenda and the research agenda should form a dynamic interplay, I'm looking forward to continue combining clinical work and research in general practice. I currently work 50% in clinical practice and 50% in academia.

On a personal note, I love sports and enjoy going out for a run, ride or pint (preferably Guinness or German Wefenweizen) with friends. I'm living in lovely Meerssen, just 5 minutes outside Maastricht, with my wife Birgit, who is an archaeologist, with a specialty in human bones. We enjoy our time with our son Lasse, who was born on 20-11-2011

Research topics: common infections, antibiotic prescribing, adherence, communication skills, (point of care) diagnostic testing, patient centered clinical methods.

 

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After graduation from Medical School at Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg, in 1999 and three years of General Internal Medicine at Regensburg University Hospital, I continued with a clinical internship at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, Massachusetts, followed by the residency program in Public Health and General Preventive Medicine at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Maryland. I obtained an MPH, an unrestricted medical licence in the state of Pennsylvania and certification in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health. In 2005, I moved back to Germany as lecturer at the Institute for Medical Management and Health Care Sciences at University of Bayreuth. I completed my clinical residency in a GP office leading to certification in Internal Medicine and General Practice in 2007. From 2008-2015, I was involved in building up the Institute of General Practice and Family Medicine at Jena University Hospital. In 2015, I was appointed professor and head of the division of primary care at University of Oldenburg where the European Medical School Oldenburg Groningen is being established. I continue to see patients in a private GP office .
My main research area is evidence-based medicine and health services research. I am involved in clinical guideline projects on Lyme borreliosis and diabetes.

 

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I qualified from Nottingham University in 1998 and joined the North Staffordshire Academic VTS in 1999. This provided two years as an academic registrar that allowed the completion of a MMedSci investigating the prevalence of chronic pain in young adults.

On completing my GP training, I took a part-time partnership in Newcastle-under-Lyme and completed an MPhil degree exploring the relationship between early life events and chronic pain in adulthood. This MPhil led to me being awarded the first Arthritis Research Campaign Primary Care Fellowship that formed the basis of my PhD. The PhD has investigated the prognosis of musculoskeletal pain in older adults in general practice.

My main interests are musculoskeletal research, depression and anxiety as comorbid conditions and clinical epidemiology. I also lead a programme of research around the early diagnosis and optimal management of inflammatory disorders in primary care.

 

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Liam qualified from Trinity College, Dublin in 1995 and, after completing general practice training in the Scottish highlands and surviving some remote health care postings to Guyana and Ecuador, he returned to National University of Ireland, Galway. Here, he completed higher training in academic general practice and was then appointed lecturer in primary care in 2004 and senior lecturer in general practice in June 2010. He combines this with working as a GP principal in a single-handed rural practice in Ballyvaughan, Co Clare three days a week and is chairman of the North Clare Primary Care Team.
His primary research interests are Cardiovascular Multimorbidity and Connected Health in which he completed his MD. He is currently principal investigator on a Health Research Board study of cardiovascular multimorbidity in primary care as well as a €2.3 million EU study of telemedicine as part of the Northern Periphery Programme. Other research interests include falls prevention in the elderly, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, adherence to medication, and research capacity in primary care. He was appointed HRB Cochrane fellow in 2007 and is lead author of Cochrane systematic reviews in hypertension as well as adherence to cardiovascular medication for BMJ Clinical Evidence. He is also founding clinical director of the Western General Practice Research and Education Network (WREN).

 

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Daniel Kotz was born in Germany and studied physiotherapy (BSc), Health Sciences (MSc) and Epidemiology (MSc cum laude) in the Netherlands. After obtaining his PhD at Maastricht University in 2008 he was granted a Kootstra Talent Fellowship. Since then he has been working as a Postdoctoral Fellow and later as an Assistant Professor at Maastricht University/CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, and as an honorary research fellow at the University College London and the University of Edinburgh. His main research areas are tobacco addiction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and methodology and statistics in clinical epidemiology.

He has published his work in leading journals in the categories general medicine (Lancet), respiratory medicine (Thorax, Chest, European Respiratory Journal), public health/epidemiology (Addiction, Tobacco Control), and allergy (Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology). His current work-related activities include: Assistant Editor of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology; Board member and Communication Officer of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Europe; secretary of the scientific committee of CAPHRI; co-founder of the Journal Club Mesch.

Daniel Kotz was born in Germany and studied physiotherapy (BSc), Health Sciences (MSc) and Epidemiology (MSc cum laude) in the Netherlands. After obtaining his PhD at Maastricht University in 2008 he was granted a Kootstra Talent Fellowship. Since then he has been working as a Postdoctoral Fellow and later as an Assistant Professor at Maastricht University/CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, and as an honorary research fellow at the University College London and the University of Edinburgh. His main research areas are tobacco addiction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and methodology and statistics in clinical epidemiology.

He has published his work in leading journals in the categories general medicine (Lancet), respiratory medicine (Thorax, Chest, European Respiratory Journal), public health/epidemiology (Addiction, Tobacco Control), and allergy (Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology). His current work-related activities include: Assistant Editor of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology; Board member and Communication Officer of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Europe; secretary of the scientific committee of CAPHRI; co-founder of the Journal Club Mesch.

 

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Richard McManus is Professor of Primary Care Research at the University of Oxford and a part time GP at 27 Beaumont St in Oxford. His research interests lie mainly in cardiovascular disease and he has published work on the management of chest pain in primary care, blood pressure measurement, stroke management in primary care and self monitoring in hypertension.

He holds an NIHR Professorship and leads an NIHR Programme Grant around Self Monitoring in Hypertension as well as several other NIHR funded studies on the primary care management of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. He supervises PhD students undertaking projects in diabetes, hypertension and chronic kidney disease. He chairs the Blood Pressure Monitoring Working Party of the British Hypertension Society and is Guardian of the RCGP Cardiovascular Curriculum. He provides expert advice to NICE, Department of Health and the European Society of Cardiology.

 

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I am a general internist and a primary care researcher of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt, Main. I hold an MPH degree from the Hanover Medical School. I am the key author of an evidence based guideline on chronic heart failure addressing primary care management, funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), and authorized by the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine (DEGAM). The guideline makes use of a new method I developed, which I have called the systematic guideline review. This guideline was selected as source guideline for the development of a National Guideline (NVL) and for the disease management program (DMP) on chronic heart failure for nationwide implementation. I was elected to both the DMP expert committee, and the development group of the NVL.

Currently, I conduct the 24-month cluster-RCT ‘PRIMUM’ (PRIoritization and optimization of MUltimedication in Multimorbidity) funded by the BMBF. The primary objective of the study is to determine whether the complex intervention will improve the appropriateness of prescriptions compared to usual care. The intervention consists of a checklist-based pre-consultation interview and medication reconciliation by a health care assistant of the practice, the use of a computerized decision support system and a physician-patient consultation on medication related problems. It was found feasible in the 12-month PRIMUM pilot study.

In PRIMUM I collaborate with researchers from other BI universities: André Knottnerus and Marian van den Akker from Maastricht University, Rafael Perera and Jose Martinez Valderas (Chema, BI cohort 3) from Oxford University and several others are planned.

My ongoing research interests focus on clinical decision support in chronic conditions such as chronic heart failure, in particular in combination with co- and multimorbidity, on multi-morbid patients with poly-pharmacotherapy, and care management in GP practices, as well as methodology with a focus on guideline development and systematic reviews.

 

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I am a Clinical Reader in the Department of Primary Care and Public Health at Imperial College London. I have worked as an inner city GP since 1995 and practise at Chartfield Surgery in Putney. My research is aimed at finding better ways to prevent, detect and treat childhood illness from birth into adulthood using epidemiological birth cohort studies. I lead a team of researchers in the Child Health Unit with funding support from NIHR Programme Development Grants and fellowships on 3 research areas:

1) Measuring impact of primary care quality improvement on child health
2) Epidemiology and treatment of conditions in children and young people
3) Child obesity and early cardiovascular risk

To date, I have published over 80 original articles and obtained over £4 million in personal grant funding for research and contributed to 3 major infrastructure grants including the national Medicines for Children Research Network (MCRN) the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research & Care (CLAHRC) programme grant and a £2m NIHR programme grant. I have established international collaborations with the University of Southern Carolina (US), University of Mauritius and the University of Hong Kong since 2006.
I am a member of the UK Department of Health’s Child Death Review Panel and the UK National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE). Teaching and training roles include 3 PhD students, Masters in Public Health lecturer and national and international academic postgraduate training activity for NIHR academic clinical fellowship training

 

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I am an Academic General Practitioner and Head of the Health Services and Policy Research Group at the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford.

Before joining the Department in March 2010, I held appointments at the National Primary Care Research and Development Centre, University of Manchester (2007-2010), the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) (2006) and the Health Services Research Unit of IMIM-Hospital del Mar (Spain), for 8 years.

I have a strong commitment to high quality research (my main activity), clinical practice, and teaching. My research has covered many different aspects of research on structure, processes and outcome of health services, and currently my research focuses on three main inter-related topics: the use of patient reported outcomes in clinical practice, the provision of care for people with multi-morbidity, and the implementation of strategies for improving the quality and safety of primary care.

I hold a NIHR Clinician Scientist Award for the study of clinical applications of Patient Reported Outcomes in complex patients in Primary Care. I am a Senior Researcher at Policy Research Unit on Quality and Outcomes of Patient Centred Care, Senior Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics (European Observatory of Health Systems and Policies), Associate Editor of the journals Quality of Life Research and European Journal of General Practice and member of the Cochrane Collaboration group on PRO Methods