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Abstract Background This study aims to estimate the economic costs of care provided to children born very preterm and extremely preterm across 11 European countries, and to understand what perinatal and socioeconomic factors contribute to higher costs. Methods Generalised linear modelling was used to explore the association between perinatal and sociodemographic characteristics and total economic costs (€, 2016 prices) during the fifth year of life. Results Lower gestational age was associated with increased mean societal costs of €2755 (p < 0.001), €752 (p < 0.01) and €657 (p < 0.01) for children born at < 26, 26–27 and 28–29 weeks, respectively, in comparison to the reference group born at 30–31 weeks. A sensitivity analyses that excluded variables (BPD, any neonatal morbidity and presence of congenital anomaly) plausibly lying on the causal pathway between gestational age at birth and economic outcomes elevated incremental societal costs by €1482, €763 and €144 at < 26, 26–27 and 28–29 weeks, respectively, in comparison to the baseline model. Conclusion This study provides new evidence about the main cost drivers associated with preterm birth in European countries. Evidence identified by this study can act as inputs within cost-effectiveness models for preventive or treatment interventions for preterm birth. Impact What is the key message of your article? This study provides new evidence about the magnitude and drivers of economic costs associated with preterm birth in European countries. What does it add to the existing literature? Lower gestational age is associated with increased mean societal costs during mid-childhood with indirect costs representing a key driver of increased costs. What is the impact? For policy makers, this study adds to sparse evidence about the main cost drivers associated with preterm birth in European countries beyond the first 2 years of life.

Original publication

DOI

10.1038/s41390-021-01769-z

Type

Journal article

Journal

Pediatric Research

Publisher

Springer Science and Business Media LLC

Publication Date

12/11/2021