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Aim: Hypoglycaemia may have a detrimental impact on quality of life for patients with Type2 diabetes. There are few clinical studies exploring the impact of experiencing hypoglycaemia on beliefs about diabetes and health status. The aim of this study was to explore associations between experience of hypoglycaemia and changes in diabetes beliefs and self-reported health status in patients with non-insulin-treated Type2 diabetes using a blood glucose meter. Methods One-year prospective cohort analysis of 226 patients recruited to a randomized trial evaluating the impact of self-monitoring of blood glucose. Self-reported hypoglycaemia over 1year was categorized into three groups: (1) no experience of hypoglycaemia; (2) blood glucose measurements < 4mmol/l with no associated symptoms of hypoglycaemia (grade1); and (3) symptomatic hypoglycaemia (grade2 and 3). Measures of beliefs about diabetes (Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire) and health status (EuroQol-5D) were assessed at baseline and 1year. Differences in mean changes over 1year were explored with analyses of covariance. Results There was a significant increase in mean score in beliefs about personal control (1.14; 95%CI 0.14-2.14) among those experiencing grade1 hypoglycaemia compared with those not experiencing hypoglycaemia. There were no significant differences in changes in health status between groups, with small overall changes that were inconsistent between groups. Conclusions This study does not provide support for a long-term adverse impact on beliefs about diabetes or health status from the experience of mild symptomatic hypoglycaemia, in well-controlled, non-insulin-treated patients with Type2 diabetes using self-monitoring of blood glucose. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/j.1464-5491.2011.03340.x

Type

Journal article

Journal

Diabetic Medicine

Publication Date

01/11/2011

Volume

28

Pages

1395 - 1400