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Reconsultation for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is common in general practice, but those who reconsult rarely have more significant illness warranting antibiotics. Knowledge of factors that predict patient-initiated reconsultation may allow clinicians to address specific issues during the initial consultation that could reduce reconsultations. Thirty-three per cent of a cohort of 431 LRTI patients in a randomised controlled trial reconsulted. Excluding 35 patients with GP-requested reconsultation left 28% (112/396) with a patient-initiated reconsultation during 28-day follow-up. Patient-reported dyspnoea and concerns that persisted after the initial consultation independently predicted patient-initiated reconsultation. ©British Journal of General Practice 2009.

Original publication

DOI

10.3399/bjgp09X472656

Type

Journal article

Journal

British Journal of General Practice

Publication Date

01/10/2009

Volume

59

Pages

761 - 764