Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Obesity in children arises from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and behaviour, primarily relating to dietary habits and physical activity. Evidence for specific behavioural factors that promote or protect against excess weight gain in children is more limited than in adults, and the effects of growth and development are not clear. A number of behavioural risk factors has been postulated, including diets with a high energy density, high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, large portion sizes, eating patterns, high levels of sedentary behaviour and low levels of physical activity. However, most evidence is derived from cross-sectional studies which frequently yield conflicting results. More prospective studies with accurate measures of exposures and outcomes in terms of body composition are needed to provide more robust evidence on which to base interventions to achieve long-term behavioural change and prevent excess weight gains in children. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.beem.2005.04.003

Type

Journal article

Journal

Best Practice and Research: Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

Publication Date

01/09/2005

Volume

19

Pages

343 - 358