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© 2016 The Authors Objectives To understand the experiences of patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) using self-management digital interventions (DIs) for chronic physical health conditions. Methods A systematic search was conducted in 6 electronic databases. Qualitative studies describing users’ experiences of self-management DIs were included, and authors’ interpretations were synthesised using meta-ethnography. Results 30 papers met the inclusion criteria, covering a range of DIs and chronic conditions, including hypertension, asthma and heart disease. The review found that patients monitoring their health felt reassured by the insight this provided, and perceived they had more meaningful consultations with the HCP. These benefits were elicited by simple tele-monitoring systems as well as multifaceted DIs. Patients appeared to feel more reliant on HCPs if they received regular feedback from the HCP. HCPs focused mainly on their improved clinical control, and some also appreciated patients’ increased understanding of their condition. Conclusions Patients using self-management DIs tend to feel well cared for and perceive that they adopt a more active role in consultations, whilst HCPs focus on the clinical benefits provided by DIs. Practice implications DIs can simultaneously support patient condition management, and HCPs’ control of patient health. Tele-monitoring physiological data can promote complex behaviour change amongst patients.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.pec.2016.10.019

Type

Journal article

Journal

Patient Education and Counseling

Publication Date

01/04/2017

Volume

100

Pages

616 - 635