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Insufficient evidence to suggest device designed to lower blood pressure is effective.

Music device doesnt drop diabetics blood pressure
Dr Kamal Ram Mahtani, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford

A device that plays a melody in an attempt to slow people's breathing didn't lower the blood pressure of people with diabetes, according to a new study.

In theory, the device works by measuring the wearer's breathing and playing a melody to reduce the number of breaths they take per minute, which relaxes blood vessels and - in turn - lowers blood pressure.

Past research on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved RESPeRATE device, however, has produced mixed results.

Last year, a review of eight studies that evaluated the device found it lowered the participants' blood pressure, but that benefit disappeared when the researchers excluded studies sponsored by RESPeRATE's maker - InterCure Ltd.

Dr. Kamal R. Mahtani, who was not involved with the new study but led last year's analysis, said the new findings back up their earlier findings.

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There is no clear evidence for clinical benefit and this new paper is interesting because it's highlighting a potential harm - Dr Kamal Ram Mahtani, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford