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On Tuesday 29 May 2018, the Oxford Blue Plaque Society unveiled two plaques in Oxford commemorating penicillin, one on the Western wall of the South wing of Oxford’s Radcliffe Infirmary, currently occupied by the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, and one on the front (Southern) wall of the William Dunn School. Here Jeff Aronson notices these, two other plaques, and a memorial stone, reflects on the long history of penicillin, and includes personal memories about some of those who were involved in the Oxford work.


Health Services Researcher Gemma Hughes writes about what the House of Commons Health and Social Care Committee's Integrated Care Report adds to the discourse of integrated care, and what remains the same.


Sarah Morrish tells the story of the first human trial of penicillin, which took place on our site in 1941.


Helen Adams, Public Engagement Coordinator for the Livestock, Environment and People (LEAP) project, introduces the project and writes about the team’s first foray into public engagement at Super Science Saturday in March 2018. Outreach is not just a lot of fun, but can help influence the research too…


What are the new 'one-stop shops' for less obvious cancer symptoms, and how is this service being developed and evaluated in Oxfordshire? GP and Clinical Researcher Dr Brian D Nicholson, from the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, is part of the team who developed the region’s pilot site, one of ten across the country, and explains why understanding non-specific symptoms is important.


SPCR Research Fellow Dr Emma Palmer-Cooper and Health Psychology Researcher Dr Anne Ferrey write about an innovative public engagement project that sets out to investigate whether yarn-based crafting can improve health and wellbeing. The project recently received a University of Oxford Public Engagement with Research Seed Fund Award.


NIHR CLAHRC Oxford Communications Officer Gavin Hubbard interviews DPhil student Georgia Richards about her recent move from Australia and what prompted a change of heart towards a research career rather than studying medicine.


Senior Research Fellow James Sheppard describes how the department has supported him to progress his career while achieving a positive work–life balance through shared parental leave.


Professor Carl Heneghan, Director of the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Official Fellow of Kellogg College, discusses the role of code breaking in healthcare, linking its use to the famous Enigma Machine and explaining why the department is linking up with Kellogg College's upcoming 'Bletchley Park Week.'


PPI Coordinators Lynne Maddocks (NIHR CLAHRC Oxford and Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences) and Polly Kerr (NIHR Oxford BRC) discuss their initiative to provide training for their public contributors in some of the essentials of medical research, and why this is important.