Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
© Shutterstock

The Clinical Informatics and Health Outcomes Group is a dynamic and dedicated team of researchers, SQL developers, statisticians and practice liaison officers who work with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre to monitor and report on the incidence of common illnesses in the community. We extract and aggregate data from primary care computer systems and other parts of the health system for cross-sectional, cohort and case-control studies.

Having relocated to Oxford from the University of Surrey in 2019, we have a rich history of projects around how technology can enable quality and support the implementation of clinical governance. 

RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC)

Group Lead, Professor Simon de Lusignan, is Medical Director of the RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC), which utilises from an extensive network of more than 500 practices to provide a timely picture of consultations by diagnosis with sentinel GPs in England. The RSC is the principal primary care surveillance system across England, offering a nationally representative sample.

The incidence data provides the College, Public Health England (PHE) and the Department of Health and Social Care with early warning of changes in the incidence of common illnesses presenting to general practice surgeries, particularly important for illnesses such as influenza like-illness and incidence rates for acute illnesses, as detailed in the RCGP’s weekly Communicable and Respiratory Disease Report for England.

RCGP Workload Observatory

The Workload Observatory reports on trends in activity across a nationally representative network of general practices.  It provides hard, near real time evidence on current workload levels as well as a picture of the complexity of cases that are increasingly being seen in general practice. This in turn will help drive national policy and inform national strategy.

Our team